Tag Archive | Fairy Tale

Movie Review: Gretel & Hansel

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IMDB Summary:

A long time ago in a distant fairy tale countryside, a young girl leads her little brother into a dark wood in desperate search of food and work, only to stumble upon a nexus of terrifying evil.

My Review:

What had me right away was the trailer! It was right up my freaking alley! Plus, I’m a big dark fantasy and horror lover. I was ready and my expectations were high!

Let me get started on my first thing! The music score! Probably one of my favorite music scores from a horror film. Seriously, awesome! The atmosphere has that slow moving, creepy, and beautiful quality that I love so dearly! And the movie was just deliciously weird in general!

My lady, Alice Krige, was so dang good! I’ve loved her since Sleepwalkers, which is still one of my favorite movies ever! Then comes Sophia Lillis. I knew she was going to be great because she was fab in It, and she was just as great here. Also, the clothing, the era, please someone get me the heck out of here and back to that awesome time!

Overall, I definitely recommend Gretel & Hansel if you like movies such as The Witch and other atmospheric movies like that! A+++++

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What’s your favorite fairy tale?

Review: Sisters Red

Title: Sisters Red

Author: Jackson Pearce

Date of Publication: June 7th, 2010

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Goodreads Summary:

Scarlett March lives to hunt the Fenris — the werewolves that took her eye when she was defending her sister Rosie from a brutal attack. Armed with a razor-sharp hatchet and blood-red cloak, Scarlett is an expert at luring and slaying the wolves. She’s determined to protect other young girls from a grisly death, and her raging heart will not rest until every single wolf is dead.

Rosie March once felt her bond with her sister was unbreakable. Owing Scarlett her life, Rosie hunts ferociously alongside her. But even as more girls’ bodies pile up in the city and the Fenris seem to be gaining power, Rosie dreams of a life beyond the wolves. She finds herself drawn to Silas, a young woodsman who is deadly with an ax and Scarlett’s only friend — but does loving him mean betraying her sister and all that they’ve worked for?

My Review:

Oh boy! So Little Red Riding Hood is one of my favorite fairy tales ever, so I was pretty excited for this one. And I will say this retelling was a lot of fun!

But here’s my issue. First, I think Scarlett should have been the love interest of Silas! But if it couldn’t have been Scarlett, I would have been fine with Rosie. But what I’m not fine with is that Silas is 21 and Rosie is 16. Would it have been that hard to have bumped Rosie’s age up or Silas’s age down? And then there were several situations where there were old Fenris (wolves) that lusted for Rosie as well so that made me feel weird too!

Other than that, the retelling aspect felt original with good dialogue and a super interesting concept! Plus anything with werewolves can draw me in!

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What’s your favorite fairy tale?

Fantasy & Fairy Tale Book Fair + $100 Giveaway!

Add Clouded by Envy to Goodreads

Clouded by Envy, as well as many awesome others, is part of the Fantasy & Fairy Tale Book Fair! Take a look at all the pretty covers here!

Enter the $100 Amazon Gift Card Giveaway!

Enter Here!

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Which cover was your favorite from the book fair?

Review: The Winter of the Witch

Title: The Winter of the Witch

Author: Katherine Arden

Date of Publication: January 9th, 2019

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Goodreads Summary:

In the stunning conclusion to the bestselling Winternight Trilogy, following The Bear and the Nightingale and The Girl in the Tower, Vasya returns to save Russia and the spirit realm, battling enemies both mortal and magic.

My Review:

Do-do-do-do-do … so I fought back and forth with this book the whole read. I was bored a lot during the first 40%, then things got interesting, then I got bored again, then things were magnanimous. But, Frost Demon, you make every scene you are in worth reading. I seriously think I would have enjoyed it more if he had his own POV. Like we get POVs from a lot of others, but never my boy! Whyyyyyyyy nottttttttt??????????

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Photo Credit

At times my issues came with Vasya. I felt sometimes she needed more emotions? I guess? Sometimes, or a lot of the time, I can be a robotic person so I do get that. Also, when it came to Morozko, I would have preferred more of a team effort when it came to certain things. A lot of the time these days, as I’ve said before, authors are making the girls so bad ass and then the guy seems like a pathetic weakling. I want a team effort—equality—not the guy saying, “let’s go hide in a corner,” and then the girl is all like, “I’m going to go win this war!” I don’t get it… Yet there were some perfect scenes between Vasya and Morozko that were so good and swoooooooon!

When it came to the Winter of the Witch, not sure if the right word is political or if the book felt like it had more of an agenda, but when it came to that stuff, I was just like come on already! I want more of the magical feel I first felt! But don’t worry, there are some gorgeous scenes, too.

Anyway, the book was beautifully written. I just miss the whimsical/fairy tale feel of the first book and the intriguing feeling I had while reading the second book. Also Konstantin, the creep, is still crazy! His character is so interesting at times, but I also want to smack him for his insane thoughts. I will say that the Bear is probably one of my new favorite characters—ever. And Sasha I still love more than anything. Overall I did like the way it came to an end, but can a certain character get their own book now???

 

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Have you started this trilogy?

Review: Stardust

Title: Stardust

Author: Neil Gaiman

Date of Publication: August 29th, 2006

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Goodreads Summary:

Young Tristran Thorn will do anything to win the cold heart of beautiful Victoria—even fetch her the star they watch fall from the night sky. But to do so, he must enter the unexplored lands on the other side of the ancient wall that gives their tiny village its name. Beyond that old stone wall, Tristran learns, lies Faerie—where nothing, not even a fallen star, is what he imagined.

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Neil Gaiman comes a remarkable quest into the dark and miraculous—in pursuit of love and the utterly impossible.

My Review:

Stardust is one of my favorite movies ever, so I was very hesitant to read the book. There were some differences throughout, and I actually liked seeing this. This is my second book by Gaiman, and his writing seems to be able to suck me right in and not let go. It’s extraordinary!

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Photo Credit

Tristran was a bit of an idiot, but no surprise because he is also one in the movie, too! I loved Yvaine in this book, and all the side characters. This was one of the few times where I felt the movie was actually better than the book, even though I loved them both!

The unicorn scene was much gorier here than in the movie which I liked that part better, so I would debate which scenes I liked better where. Yvaine was a star, and she really did shine here! Lol, I like my last line!

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Have you read this book or seen the movie?

Review: The Bear and the Nightingale

Title: The Bear and the Nightingale

Author: Katherine Arden

Date of Publication: January 10th, 2017

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Goodreads Summary:

A young woman’s family is threatened by forces both real and fantastical in this debut novel inspired by Russian fairy tales.

In a village at the edge of the wilderness of northern Russia, where the winds blow cold and the snow falls many months of the year, a stranger with piercing blue eyes presents a new father with a gift – a precious jewel on a delicate chain, intended for his young daughter. Uncertain of its meaning, Pytor hides the gift away and Vasya grows up a wild, willful girl, to the chagrin of her family. But when mysterious forces threaten the happiness of their village, Vasya discovers that, armed only with the necklace, she may be the only one who can keep the darkness at bay.

My Review:

This book is multiple point of views, but sometimes it felt like narrator style since the way it bounces back and forth between characters. It actually didn’t bother me the way I thought that it was going to.

The pacing is a slow and beautiful build. The beginning is just developing the characters and getting to know them. Not a lot actually happens in the beginning, but it is still interesting getting to learn about the characters.

One of the main characters, Vasya, is my favorite. She can see different creatures, and she bounces to her own drum beat. Her brother, Alyosha, I loved as well, and I loved the bond between him and Vasya.

When the priest comes into the picture things started to slow down for me, and I wasn’t exactly sure what the purpose of him was, but when the book hit 65% on my Kindle, things began to really pick up. I don’t know what to say about him except he was just out of his mind most of the time!

I was disappointed that there wasn’t more of the frost demon. His character was the most interesting, and I wanted to see more of him. What I did see of him, I loved! The writing, I thought was really good. I did get confused a lot at the beginning with all the characters multiple names for one character, and I wanted a little more to the ending, but overall I really liked it!

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How does this book sound to you?

Review: The Fir Tree

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ABOUT THE FIR TREE

Gorgeously packaged with intricate illustrations from Finnish illustrator, Sanna Annukka, this new edition of Hans Christian Andersen’s well-loved fairy tale, The Fir Tree, is the perfect holiday gift for adults and children alike.

Hans Christian Andersen’s tragic tale of naive greed and dissatisfaction is retold through the striking and contemporary illustrations of Finnish illustrator Sanna Annukka. Cloth-bound in rich forest green, with gold foil embellishments, The Fir Tree is elevated from a children’s book to a unique work of art and makes an ideal gift for people of all ages.

My Review:

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First, that cover!! The cover is so perfect, and the illustrations within are so beautiful. I have never read any of Hans Christen Andersen’s fairy tales, so this was my first go around. I would like to say I am not sure about all of his fairy tales, but at least this one may not be for everyone. I on the other hand really enjoyed it.

This book is about a Fir Tree who starts out as a youngling, and it watches other trees around it being taken away for various reasons, eventually it gets cut down and is going to learn what will be it’s destiny. I think what made this book harder for me was it is as if the tree is an actual person that thinks and feels, so you can’t help but feel bad for this tree.

I would definitely pick up another fairy tale from Hans, and to see how it compares to this one. The thing I liked most about this book was that it wasn’t all flowers and roses and not everything in life is great.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Hans Christian Andersen (1805—75) was born in Odense, Denmark, the son of a poor shoemaker, who nonetheless was a great reader, made a toy-theatre for his son and taught him to notice every natural wonder as they walked in the woods together on Sundays. His father died when he was eleven, and it wasn’t until six years later that, with the help of a patron, he finally went to a state secondary school attended by much youger children. There he suffered at the hands of a cruel headmaster, but he aquired an education and was determined to be a writer. He published his first novel and his first fairy tales in 1835; thereafter he wrote over 150 more of these stories which have become classics in many languages.A lonely man who never married, he was also an anxious man; he loved travelling, but would carry a coil of rope with him in case of fire in his hotel. Although he originally addressed his fairy tales to children (and some would maintain he had a streak of childhood in his nature) he insisted they were ‘for all ages’, and the gentleness and humor that are their characteristics are recognized by everyone.

I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.

 

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Have you read a Hans Christian Andersen book?